Speech therapy for adults

SERVICES FOR ADULTS

 

APHASIA (POST-STROKE) THERAPY

An acquired language difficulty, also known as an aphasia, can affect your understanding of language (receptive language), and/or your use of spoken language (expressive language). Many people have aphasia after a stroke, but it can be the result of any brain injury, including traumatic brain injury, a brain tumor, or an infection of the brain. Read more >>

Woman undergoing aphasia post-stroke therapy

DYSARTHRIA (SLURRED SPEECH)

Do you struggle to produce clear speech, or often need to repeat yourself because others find your speech difficult to understand? Do you speak too quickly, too slowly, or has your voice changed in some way? These could be signs of what is known as dysarthria. Dysarthria is the result of brain damage causing you to have weak muscles in any of the following areas: the face, jaw, lips, tongue, throat, velum (the part that either closes off the nasal cavity or allows air to go through the nasal cavity) and muscles of breathing. Read more >>

Woman undergoing dysarthria slurred speech therapy

DYSPHAGIA (SWALLOWING DIFFICULTIES)

Swallowing and eating is not only important to our survival but also to our sense of connection, social identity, and social involvement with others. You may have never thought about how complex swallowing is or how important it is to your daily interactions with others until you experience difficulties and/or discomfort with eating. Difficulties with eating including difficulties in the oral cavity (mouth), pharynx, esophagus (tube in which transfers food into stomach) and/or gastroesophageal junction (the location where food enters the stomach) is known as dysphagia and can be a result of several different medical conditions, including structural changes or differences in your body, stroke, traumatic brain injury or a neurological condition. Read more >>

Woman with swallowing difficulties undergoing dysphagia therapy